الأربعاء، 19 يوليو، 2017

Tips for the First 30 Days of Dog Adoption 2017 - cub web

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Tips for the First 30 Days of Dog Adoption 2017 - cub web



The first few days in your home are special and critical for a pet. Your new dog will be confused about where he is and what to expect from you. Setting up some clear structure with your family for your dog will be paramount in making as smooth a transition as possible.








Before You Bring Your Dog Home:


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Determine where your dog will be spending most of his time. Because he will be under a lot of stress with the change of environment (from shelter or foster home to your house), he may forget any housebreaking (if any) he’s learned. Often a kitchen will work best for easy clean-up.
If you plan on crate training your dog, be sure to have a crate set-up and ready to go for when you bring your new dog home. Find out more about crate training your dog.
Dog-proof the area where your pooch will spend most of his time during the first few months. This may mean taping loose electrical cords to baseboards; storing household chemicals on high shelves; removing plants, rugs, and breakables; setting up the crate, and installing baby gates.
Training your dog will start the first moment you have him. Take time to create a vocabulary list everyone will use when giving your dog directions. This will help prevent confusion and help your dog learn his commands more quickly. Not sure which commands to use? Check out How to Talk to Your Dog.
Bring an ID tag with your phone number on it with you when you pick up your dog so that he has an extra measure of safety for the ride home and the first few uneasy days. If he is microchipped, be sure to register your contact information with the chip’s company, if the rescue or shelter did not already do so.
First Day:

We know moving is stressful — and your new dog feels the same way! Give him time to acclimate to your home and family before introducing him to strangers. Make sure children know how to approach the dog without overwhelming him. Go here for more on introducing dogs and children.
When you pick up your dog, remember to ask what and when he was fed. Replicate that schedule for at least the first few days to avoid gastric distress. If you wish to switch to a different brand, do so over a period of about a week by adding one part new food to three parts of the old for several days; then switch to half new food, half old, and then one part old to three parts new. For more information about your dog’s diet, check out our section on Dog Nutrition.
On the way home, your dog should be safely secured, preferably in a crate. Some dogs find car trips stressful, so having him in a safe place will make the trip home easier on him and you.
Once home, take him to his toileting area immediately and spend a good amount of time with him so he will get used to the area and relieve himself. Even if your dog does relieve himself during this time, be prepared for accidents. Coming into a new home with new people, new smells and new sounds can throw even the most housebroken dog off-track, so be ready just in case. Need more housetraining tips? Check out our Dog Housetraining section.
If you plan on crate training your dog, leave the crate open so that he can go in whenever he feels like it in case he gets overwhelmed. Also, be sure to check out the do’s and don’ts of crate training your dog.
From there, start your schedule of feeding, toileting and play/exercise. From Day One, your dog will need family time and brief periods of solitary confinement. Don’t give in and comfort him if he whines when left alone. Instead, give him attention for good behavior, such as chewing on a toy or resting quietly (Source: Preparing Your Home For A New Dog).
For the first few days, remain calm and quiet around your dog, limiting too much excitement (such as the dog park or neighborhood children). Not only will this allow your dog to settle in easier, it will give you more one-on-one time to get to know him and his likes/dislikes.
If he came from another home, objects like leashes, hands, rolled up newspapers and magazines, feet, chairs and sticks are just some of the pieces of “training equipment” that may have been used on this dog. Words like “come here” and “lie down” may bring forth a reaction other than the one you expect.Or maybe he led a sheltered life and was never socialized to children or sidewalk activity. This dog may be the product of a never-ending series of scrambled communications and unreal expectations that will require patience on your part.
Following Weeks:

People often say they don’t see their dog’s true personality until several weeks after adoption. Your dog may be a bit uneasy at first as he gets to know you. Be patient and understanding while also keeping to the schedule you intend to maintain for feeding, walks, etc. This schedule will show your dog what is expected of him as well as what he can expect from you.
After discussing it with your veterinarian to ensure your dog has all the necessary vaccines, you may wish to take your dog to group training classes or the dog park. Pay close attention to your dog’s body language to be sure he’s having a good time — and is not fearful or a dog park bully. If you’re unsure of what signs to watch for, check out this video on safety at the dog park.
To have a long and happy life together with your dog, stick to the original schedule you created, ensuring your dog always has the food, potty time and attention he needs. You’ll be bonded in no time! For more information on creating a feeding schedule for your dog visit How Often Should You Feed Your Dog?
If you encounter behavior issues you are unfamiliar with, ask your veterinarian for a trainer recommendation. Select a trainer who uses positive-reinforcement techniques to help you and your dog overcome these behavior obstacles. Visit Dog Training for more information on reward-based training.
Congratulations! If you follow these tips, you’ll be on your way to having a well-adjusted canine family member.

How to understand the food ingredients of pets - cub web

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By-products: They’re what’s for dinner. At least if you’re a dog or cat, although my wife Teresa and I have been to some pretty fancy restaurants that served what many people would consider by-products. Liver, anyone?

Pet food ingredients and pet nutrition in general can be confusing for pet owners, but by-products get a bad rap that’s not always deserved. Let’s chew on the subject to find out more about them.

First, what are by-products that are used in pet food? By-products are the co-product of food ingredients, including portions of an animal that are less commonly used in the U.S. human food supply but can provide essential nutritional benefits. Some examples of by-products include clean animal parts like the liver, kidneys, heart, lungs, spleen, corn gluten meal and tallow. Doesn’t sound that different from what you’d see African wild dogs eating on Nat Geo WILD.

I’ll be the first to say that some of those things don’t seem appetizing to the human palate. However, by-products are incredibly nutrient-dense and highly palatable to animals. In fact, cats and dogs in the wild instinctively eat these organs first because they bring a wealth of nutrients such as protein, healthy fats, vitamins and minerals to the table. So it’s not a bad thing to feed by-products in your pet food so long as it is part of a complete and balanced diet.

I asked my colleague Dr. Tony Buffington, a veterinary nutritionist, if by-products have any benefits for pets. Here’s what he had to say.

“Properly produced by-products can provide a wide range of essential nutrients for pets and can be a safe and economical use of biological material.”

That’s a benefit to both humans and other animals, he notes.

Now, depending on the source and the processing, the nutrient content of by-products isn’t always reliable. Poor processing can allow by-products to become contaminated. Improper processing can also result in less availability of nutrients. That’s why it’s important to know the manufacturer’s reputation.

Pet owners can ensure their pet’s food is safe and healthy, whether it includes by-products or not, by checking to make sure manufacturers meet or exceed FDA and AAFCO standards. For example, going directly to a manufacturer’s website to learn more about what safety and quality standards they are employing such as testing raw materials for impurities and nutrient content or working with food scientists, veterinary professions and nutritionists to develop products. Any meat and poultry by-products from farm animals should originate at facilities certified by the USDA or equivalent authority.

“Avoiding all these potential problems is the responsibility of pet food manufacturers using by-products,” Dr. Buffington says. “Their success depends on the vigilance and integrity of the company.”

In general, pet owners should research the quality and safety standards of the company that makes their pet food. It’s important to know who makes your pet’s food, where it’s made, and what steps does the manufacturer take to ensure the quality and safety of their food. Here are a few tips for pet owners to learn more about their pet food:

Look beyond the ingredient list on the package and check the quality of the manufacturing and how stringent are the quality standards of the company making the food.
Go to your pet food manufacturer’s website. See if they own their factories, is their food made in the United States, and what steps do they take to ensure their pet foods meet or exceed FDA and AAFCO standards for safety and quality;
Call your pet food manufacturer and ask them about their manufacturing process, their quality and safety standards and the ingredients they use in their foods. They should be able to explain why they use any ingredient and the nutritional benefits;
Talk to your veterinarian. They understand pet food nutrition and can provide recommendations on pet foods that are safe and healthy for your pets.

الاثنين، 17 يوليو، 2017

7 Benefits of honey superior to skin and hair moisturizers - cub web

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7 Benefits of honey superior to skin and hair moisturizershello











The sweet stuff has been used in beauty routines since ancient times, and for good reason. "Anyone will benefit from implementing honey into their routine because of its antibacterial and moisturizing properties," explains Whitney Bowe, MD, a celebrity dermatologist in New York City. Stock up on these indulgent items.

Peter Thomas Roth Water Drench Hyaluronic Cloud Serum
Dry winter skin is no match for this super-hydrating serum. The combination of hyaluronic acid and honey leaves skin with a dewy, smoothed-out texture


Suave Professionals Honey Infusion 10-in-1 Leave-In Conditioning Cream
This drugstore leave-in conditioner is infused with pure honey and does a salon-level job when it comes to repairing damage. What’s more: it acts as a heat protectant. Apply on damp hair and proceed to heat style for shiny strands.

Kiehl’s Pure Vitality Skin Renewing Cream
This powerful mix of New Zealand Manuka honey and Korean red ginseng root helps encourage cell turnover and repairs the skin barrier so it appears more radiant.

Touch in Sol Feel Like Honey Moon Skin Base
This makeup base delivers a dose of skin-loving honey extract to plump, pamper, and prime—setting the scene for seamless makeup application.

Manuka Doctor Replenishing Facial Oil
Add a drop of this oil to your day and night creams for an anti-aging boost, or swipe straight on a clean face for a glowier complexion.


Le Petit Marseillais Extra Gentle Shower Creme Lavender Honey
This popular French line recently made its way stateside—and doesn’t disappoint. This scent is particularly soothing for sensitive skin and smells like lavender and honey.



Farmaesthetics Midnight Honey Bath & Beauty Oil
For skin that's oh-so-soft, step up your post-bath or shower routine with this luxe oil.





5 Foods for Healthy Eyes !!!! WOOOOOW

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hello ivery one







Beyond carrots
You've probably heard that carrots and other orange-colored fruits and vegetables promote eye health and protect vision, and it's true: Beta-carotene, a type of vitamin A that gives these foods their orange hue, helps the retina and other parts of the eye to function smoothly.
But eating your way to good eyesight isn't only about beta-carotene. Though their connection to vision isn't as well-known, several other vitamins and minerals are essential for healthy eyes. Make these five foods a staple of your diet to keep your peepers in tip-top shape.

Leafy greens
They're packed with lutein and zeaxanthin—antioxidants that, studies show, lower the risk of
.developing macular degeneration and cataracts.

Eggs
The yolk is a prime source of lutein and zeaxanthin—plus zinc, which also helps reduce your macular degeneration risk, according to Paul Dougherty, MD, medical director of Dougherty Laser Vision in Los Angeles.
Watch the video: How to Make Mini-Vegetable Frittatas  

Citrus and berries
These fruits are powerhouses of vitamin C, which has been shown to reduce the risk of developing macular degeneration and cataracts.

Almonds
They're filled with vitamin E, which slows macular degeneration, research shows. One handful (an
ounce) provides about half of your daily dose of E.

Fatty fish
Tuna, salmon, mackerel, anchovies and trout are rich in DHA, a fatty acid found in your retina—low levels of which have been linked to dry eye syndrome, says Jimmy Lee, MD, director of refractive surgery at Montefiore Medical Center, in New York City.